blindeafmute:

The realist shit I’ve seen today

blindeafmute:

The realist shit I’ve seen today

showmethesneer:

White History Classes masterpost

(x)

PSA For My White People

feathersandpaper:

this is not about us

I repeat: this is not about us

This is not about making yourself feel better or making you feel bad. And it’s definitely NOT about our opinions.

This is about shutting up, listening, accepting we are the problem, and most importantly: 

Promoting and circulating the voices of the people of this movement.

Anonymous said: I know I'm very ignorant but I don't understand why people don't believe in racism towards Caucasians. And I mean the actual definition, belief that a race is inferior. Obviously Caucasians aren't oppressed but can't that prejudice still be there? Sorry if I sound like a foolish white kid but I'm trying to understand that viewpoint. Thanks!

shitrichcollegekidssay:

Speaking strictly from a standpoint of America, and majority white countries or apartheid countries etc. I’ll address other places later: kso Lemme try and break this down I’m pretty inebriated but I’m sure other people reading this can weigh in.

Let me start from the term “reverse racism” which is what many people start trumpeting when oppressed POC try calling non-oppressed whites out on their bullshit. Well lets see.. “reverse racism” implies that there is a normal kind of racism. And that to be racist against white is some abnormal form of racism… HMM. I WONDER WHY THEY WOULD HAVE TO SEPARATELY DEFINE IT.. HMM. So anyway this is kinda where it starts–for my purposes. People start to realize that the term “reverse racism” is inherently bigoted and racist, so they try to define it as simply “Racism” because the people saying this totally “arent those racist right wingers!”

Aight, so then they go back to the old racist definitions of racism, that aren’t really accepted by legitimate scholars on the issue. This definition goes along the lines of: “discrimination and stereotyping of a certain race.” Awesome, so white people can totally be stereotyped and discriminated against for being white. It’s rare, but those pesky minorities do it on TV, and tumblr, with their sassy selves. Saying all those “slurs” like cracker and whitey and honky, etc. And making us white people feel bad. And one time I knew a kid in middle school who got beat up by a bunch of angry black kids racist against whites, he only called them n*ggers. :C

So why is that definition of racism racist? It ignores legitimate oppression, and what people actually mean when they think and say racism. Racism requires power, if there isn’t power and structure, and cultural embedding bullshit, behind the “stereotyping” and “discrimination.” Then there isn’t really racism. A lot of white people in academia, and POC who just don’t want to deal with other racist academic’s bullshit will call this “institutionalized racism.” Now this is a shitty to do, because then the term “racism” will will be applicable to white people, and this diminishes the experiences of POC.

How does it do this? The majority of white people crying about feeling the effects of racism whine about shit like being called a cracker. Wow. Such pain. Whereas blacks are beat and enslaved by the state, children of color are removed from their families and put into abusive foster cares at a much higher rate than whites much much much higher, etc. POC have more difficult times getting jobs based on their skin color, and the media either ignores them or acts as though we live in some post race society or some bullshit. blah blah blah basically the “racism” isn’t the same fucking thing.

So then people like to say things like: if a white person went to Africa they could still be racist against blacks but they wouldn’t have power behind it. Now I call bullshit. White People have a much easier time doing just about anything in Africa. #apartheid and its remnants. What about China? Yep.. still have cultural hegemony. whoops. What about Japan? mmm.. White people have a cultural, economic, and militaristic hegemony over just about everywhere. So…. the oppression is pretty much always there behind white people. thanks imperialism. 

So what should you call it when those darn people of color are making fun of y’all honky ass crackers Or whatever: rebellion.

anafterthought:

Drug Users in the US vs. Drug Prisoners in the US
via http://vimeo.com/49976070

anafterthought:

Drug Users in the US vs. Drug Prisoners in the US

via http://vimeo.com/49976070

"

If you asked a second grade class to draw a racist, 90 percent of them would come back with pictures of the Duck Dynasty guy… But that’s the image that we have of racists in America and racism in America and I just want people to understand that that’s not how it works.

Racism is not a personal hatred - I mean it can be but its not the source - the source is not a personal hatred of black people. It is a system of power, a system of oppression. It is a means for a certain group of people, in this instance, white people to maintain access to resources and power.

"

Mychal Denzel Smith on Citizen Radio. Listen to his full hour-long interview about racism, feminism, and true solidarity by clicking here or at wearecitizenradio.com (via fuckyeahcitizenradio)

medievalpoc:

Fiction Week
Hey, I just saw your post about children’s books and had to think about the question of “othering” somebody brought up at your blog a couple of weeks ago.
In this context I was wondering, if children would perceive and/ or understand the “otherness” of the…

ill-legalmexican:

Ron Paul stayin heavy on tha real issues

journolist:

St. Louis Archbishop Carlson lays out steps to ‘dismantle systemic racism’

With strife and violence in the aftermath of Michael Brown’s shooting death by a police officer in Ferguson, more than 500 St. Louis Catholics gathered for a Votive Mass for peace and justice, Aug. 20 at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis.
Archbishop Robert J. Carlson celebrated the Mass with 27 priests and, in his homily, laid out five important steps to “dismantle systemic racism,” which has become evident in Ferguson:
"I am re-establishing today the Human Rights Commission in the Archdiocese of St Louis.
"I am asking the Charles Lwanga Center to begin a study and offer solutions to decrease violence in our communities and in our families.
"I pledge an ongoing commitment to provide a pathway out of poverty by providing scholarships so that young people can receive a quality education in our Catholic schools." (He noted that 3,000 children have received scholarships in the last year.)
"I pledge my support and the support of the archdiocese to assist the churches in Ferguson to deal with issues of poverty and racism.
"Finally, I am asking each priest in the Archdiocese of St. Louis to offer a Mass for Justice and Peace."
As Archbishop Carlson noted, “This is a modest beginning, but begin we shall.”

Read more here. 

journolist:

St. Louis Archbishop Carlson lays out steps to ‘dismantle systemic racism’

With strife and violence in the aftermath of Michael Brown’s shooting death by a police officer in Ferguson, more than 500 St. Louis Catholics gathered for a Votive Mass for peace and justice, Aug. 20 at the Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis.

Archbishop Robert J. Carlson celebrated the Mass with 27 priests and, in his homily, laid out five important steps to “dismantle systemic racism,” which has become evident in Ferguson:

"I am re-establishing today the Human Rights Commission in the Archdiocese of St Louis.

"I am asking the Charles Lwanga Center to begin a study and offer solutions to decrease violence in our communities and in our families.

"I pledge an ongoing commitment to provide a pathway out of poverty by providing scholarships so that young people can receive a quality education in our Catholic schools." (He noted that 3,000 children have received scholarships in the last year.)

"I pledge my support and the support of the archdiocese to assist the churches in Ferguson to deal with issues of poverty and racism.

"Finally, I am asking each priest in the Archdiocese of St. Louis to offer a Mass for Justice and Peace."

As Archbishop Carlson noted, “This is a modest beginning, but begin we shall.”

Read more here


“Equality means everyone gets exactly the same outcome without regard to individual differences, which, in turn, ignores various starting points on the socioeconomic ladder due to circumstance or institutions like white supremacy and patriarchy. Equity, on the other hand, means everyone gets the same quality of outcome, and therefore it requires proactively rectifying issues of circumstance and institutionalized inequality in the manner, as Marx would say, from each according to their ability, to each according to their need.”
— Equality vs. Equity | AmericaWakieWakie

Equality means everyone gets exactly the same outcome without regard to individual differences, which, in turn, ignores various starting points on the socioeconomic ladder due to circumstance or institutions like white supremacy and patriarchy. Equity, on the other hand, means everyone gets the same quality of outcome, and therefore it requires proactively rectifying issues of circumstance and institutionalized inequality in the manner, as Marx would say, from each according to their ability, to each according to their need.”

Equality vs. Equity | AmericaWakieWakie

"The policeman who shot down a 10-year-old in Queens
stood over the boy with his cop shoes in childish blood
and a voice said “Die you little motherfucker” and
there are tapes to prove that. At his trial
this policeman and in his own defense
“I didn’t notice the size or nothing else
only the color.” and
there are tapes to prove that, too.
Today that 37-year-old white man with 13 years of police forcing
has been set free
by 11 white men who said they were satisfied
justice had been done
and one black woman who said
“They convinced me” meaning
they had dragged her 4’10” black woman’s frame
over the hot coals of four centuries of white male approval
until she let go the first real power she ever had
and lined her own womb with cement
to make a graveyard for our children."

— Audre Lorde “Power” (via femignome)

offcenterwriting:

You take her for granted.

You see her so often
you ask her to leave right after lunch,
while I sit:
trying not to stare too much,
laugh too hard,
smile too wide
at the fact that she is finally here.

I want to tell her, Don’t go,
but she’s your friend, not mine;
I watch her pack her…

claiming my skin

offcenterwriting:

white-washed: my classmates said i
had black skin but white insides, like
an Oreo cookie. first i
took that as a compliment, but
i wrestled with the cognitive dissonance
separating my mind from my skin; was
blackness more than melanin? i
leaned into black power, black 
art, black individuality & the strength of the
collective, learning that my body isn’t a jail but a
kingdom, and now i take pride.