thepeoplesrecord:

Today in history: 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963September 15, 2014
The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.
On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.
Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a “few first-class funerals.”
A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.
The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.
In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.
On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Today in history: 16th Street Baptist Church bombing of 1963
September 15, 2014

The Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham was used as a meeting-place for civil rights leaders such as Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy and Fred Shutterworth. Tensions became high when the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Congress on Racial Equality (CORE) became involved in a campaign to register African American to vote in Birmingham.

On Sunday, 15th September, 1963, a white man was seen getting out of a white and turquoise Chevrolet car and placing a box under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Soon afterwards, at 10.22 a.m., the bomb exploded killing Denise McNair (11), Addie Mae Collins (14), Carole Robertson (14) and Cynthia Wesley (14). The four girls had been attending Sunday school classes at the church. Twenty-three other people were also hurt by the blast.

Civil rights activists blamed George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, for the killings. Only a week before the bombing he had told the New York Times that to stop integration Alabama needed a “few first-class funerals.”

A witness identified Robert Chambliss, a member of the Ku Klux Klan, as the man who placed the bomb under the steps of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. He was arrested and charged with murder and possessing a box of 122 sticks of dynamite without a permit. On 8th October, 1963, Chambliss was found not guilty of murder and received a hundred-dollar fine and a six-month jail sentence for having the dynamite.

The case was unsolved until Bill Baxley was elected attorney general of Alabama. He requested the original Federal Bureau of Investigation files on the case and discovered that the organization had accumulated a great deal of evidence against Chambliss that had not been used in the original trial.

In November, 1977 Chambliss was tried once again for the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Now aged 73, Chambliss was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. Chambliss died in an Alabama prison on 29th October, 1985.

On 17th May, 2000, the FBI announced that the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing had been carried out by the Ku Klux Klan splinter group, the Cahaba Boys. It was claimed that four men, Robert Chambliss, Herman Cash, Thomas Blanton and Bobby Cherry had been responsible for the crime. Cash was dead but Blanton and Cherry were arrested and Blanton has since been tried and convicted.

Source

lightspeedsound:

Seriously, we need to come up with a fetish-safe tag for asian people (women especially) to use to tag their selfies with pride without the risk of being reblogged by raceplay and other gross porny fetish blogs.

So I was thinking—remember all those long lectures we got from our mamas and…

thepeoplesrecord:

Eviction & intersectionality: Why black women need housing justiceSeptember 14, 2014
My heart sank once I realized it was an eviction notice. After coming home from an underwhelming day at work, I looked forward to zoning out on TV realities that were infinitely more exciting than my own reality. I never imagined I would be greeted by a real-life soap opera in the form of an official-looking notice posted on my door. That day, I became the recipient of a one-way ticket on the eviction train, party of one. Needless to say, the notice put a wrench in my ambitious plans for the evening.

Where did I turn first? Google. I didn’t know the first thing about eviction. At that point in my life, I thought simply mentioning evictions was a little taboo — I believed eviction only happened to people way more downtrodden than myself. Growing up, whether it was true or not, I always considered my family middle class. Surely, an eviction could never happen to a girl like me (I had yet to recognize that my current job hardly qualified me for a place in the middle class and that my salary bordered those of the working poor).

Upon Googling the foreign concept of tenants being forced out of their homes, I found nothing to ease the anxiety gradually building in the pit of my stomach. The legalese, convoluted language and complete lack of tenant resources I encountered on the Internet provided little information and no peace of mind. I felt lost, dazed and confused. Surely the nice ladies in the office of my apartment complex were willing to negotiate with me to ensure a roof over a fellow woman’s head.

Rude awakening: Any sisterhood I ever had with my apartment’s white female property managers was null and void now that I was headed to Eviction Land. Solidarity be damned! After pleading with them for a merciful payment plan, they told me my best option was to pay off my balance and move immediately. Of course, I did not have enough money to pay them what I owed — I was paying far more than 30 percent of my income, which explains why I fell behind on my rent. No safety net in sight, I needed to stay in my apartment as long as possible (which was not very long according to the Google gods).

I never saw the sheriff — I vacated my apartment just in the nick of time. With my tail tucked between my legs and feeling irresponsible as ever, I moved back to Georgia (my home state) to crash on a family member’s day bed. I wish I knew then that my shame was unwarranted and that my story of eviction was not an extraordinary one. A recent study conducted by the MacArthur Foundation revealed that poor Black women are disproportionately impacted by evictions. The study found that while Black women were only 9.6 percent of Milwaukee’s population, they experienced 30 percent of the city’s court-ordered evictions. This distressing statistic was attributed to a number of factors including low wages, intimidation by male landlords and triggering the aggravation of landlords because of child and partner-related incidents. Apparently, several landlords find eviction justifiable when a Black woman merely makes a complaint about mold affecting her children’s health or when she lives with an abusive partner who causes domestic disturbances.

My “Blackness” and my “womanliness” are both things that I love about myself and other Black women; however, neither polls well in today’s discriminatory housing market. Black women face higher eviction rates than any other group because of our marginalized identities. While the term “intersectionality” has been appropriated to reference a plethora of social phenomena, it was originally coined by Black feminist scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw to describe how the multiple oppressed identities of Black women collectively contribute to how people perceive us in society. If you asked me to hypothesize why women of color bare the brunt of evictions in this country, I would point you down the path of intersectionality.

In the tradition of countless resilient Black women that came before me, I made lemonade out of lemons by carving a career path out of a hardship — stopping evictions became my line of work. After moving back to Georgia, I tapped into a vibrant community of activism, which eventually led to a job as an organizer for a housing justice organization called Occupy Our Homes Atlanta. Our mission was to repair the devastation caused by the housing crisis in Atlanta by fightingforeclosure and eviction through direct action and public pressure. 

Unsurprisingly, the majority of our residents-in-struggle were Black, and many of them were Black women. These women inspired me to no end — they were smart, radical and ready to salvage their slice of the American Dream by fighting like hell to save their homes. I will never forget one of my favorite resident-activists, Mildred Obi. A daughter of the Civil Rights Movement, she occupied her home after being evicted and eventually won it free and clear from Bank of America. Mildred harnessed her power in the name of housing justice and continues to help others in danger of losing their homes. She is a prime example of why Black women need housing justice: Because when we fight, we can win. As Black women, even the seemingly simple act of survival is a fight, so fighting for our human right to housing is inherent in us.

I carry Mildred’s spirit with me in my new position as a community organizer with the Tenants Union of Washington in Seattle, which was recently named the number one city for apartment rent increases in the country. Any push for rent stabilization in Seattle will be a hard-won fight due to a statewide ban on rent control. Displacement and gentrification both run rampant in the city as for-profit developers snatch up affordable housing and drive up rents in historical communities of color. While our city’s Just Cause Eviction Ordinance prevents landlords from terminating tenancies at will, still approximately 10 households are evicted every day. I brace myself for all of these challenges knowing that other Black women are in this fight with me ready to create space for other Black women in the housing justice movement. I fervently believe that my role in this movement is to amplify and elevate the voices of Black women because more than any other population, we need housing justice and we need it now.
Source

thepeoplesrecord:

Eviction & intersectionality: Why black women need housing justice
September 14, 2014

My heart sank once I realized it was an eviction notice. After coming home from an underwhelming day at work, I looked forward to zoning out on TV realities that were infinitely more exciting than my own reality. I never imagined I would be greeted by a real-life soap opera in the form of an official-looking notice posted on my door. That day, I became the recipient of a one-way ticket on the eviction train, party of one. Needless to say, the notice put a wrench in my ambitious plans for the evening.
Where did I turn first? Google. I didn’t know the first thing about eviction. At that point in my life, I thought simply mentioning evictions was a little taboo — I believed eviction only happened to people way more downtrodden than myself. Growing up, whether it was true or not, I always considered my family middle class. Surely, an eviction could never happen to a girl like me (I had yet to recognize that my current job hardly qualified me for a place in the middle class and that my salary bordered those of the working poor).
Upon Googling the foreign concept of tenants being forced out of their homes, I found nothing to ease the anxiety gradually building in the pit of my stomach. The legalese, convoluted language and complete lack of tenant resources I encountered on the Internet provided little information and no peace of mind. I felt lost, dazed and confused. Surely the nice ladies in the office of my apartment complex were willing to negotiate with me to ensure a roof over a fellow woman’s head.
Rude awakening: Any sisterhood I ever had with my apartment’s white female property managers was null and void now that I was headed to Eviction Land. Solidarity be damned! After pleading with them for a merciful payment plan, they told me my best option was to pay off my balance and move immediately. Of course, I did not have enough money to pay them what I owed — I was paying far more than 30 percent of my income, which explains why I fell behind on my rent. No safety net in sight, I needed to stay in my apartment as long as possible (which was not very long according to the Google gods).
I never saw the sheriff — I vacated my apartment just in the nick of time. With my tail tucked between my legs and feeling irresponsible as ever, I moved back to Georgia (my home state) to crash on a family member’s day bed. I wish I knew then that my shame was unwarranted and that my story of eviction was not an extraordinary one. A recent study conducted by the MacArthur Foundation revealed that poor Black women are disproportionately impacted by evictions. The study found that while Black women were only 9.6 percent of Milwaukee’s population, they experienced 30 percent of the city’s court-ordered evictions. This distressing statistic was attributed to a number of factors including low wages, intimidation by male landlords and triggering the aggravation of landlords because of child and partner-related incidents. Apparently, several landlords find eviction justifiable when a Black woman merely makes a complaint about mold affecting her children’s health or when she lives with an abusive partner who causes domestic disturbances.
My “Blackness” and my “womanliness” are both things that I love about myself and other Black women; however, neither polls well in today’s discriminatory housing market. Black women face higher eviction rates than any other group because of our marginalized identities. While the term “intersectionality” has been appropriated to reference a plethora of social phenomena, it was originally coined by Black feminist scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw to describe how the multiple oppressed identities of Black women collectively contribute to how people perceive us in society. If you asked me to hypothesize why women of color bare the brunt of evictions in this country, I would point you down the path of intersectionality.
In the tradition of countless resilient Black women that came before me, I made lemonade out of lemons by carving a career path out of a hardship — stopping evictions became my line of work. After moving back to Georgia, I tapped into a vibrant community of activism, which eventually led to a job as an organizer for a housing justice organization called Occupy Our Homes Atlanta. Our mission was to repair the devastation caused by the housing crisis in Atlanta by fightingforeclosure and eviction through direct action and public pressure. 
Unsurprisingly, the majority of our residents-in-struggle were Black, and many of them were Black women. These women inspired me to no end — they were smart, radical and ready to salvage their slice of the American Dream by fighting like hell to save their homes. I will never forget one of my favorite resident-activists, Mildred Obi. A daughter of the Civil Rights Movement, she occupied her home after being evicted and eventually won it free and clear from Bank of America. Mildred harnessed her power in the name of housing justice and continues to help others in danger of losing their homes. She is a prime example of why Black women need housing justice: Because when we fight, we can win. As Black women, even the seemingly simple act of survival is a fight, so fighting for our human right to housing is inherent in us.
I carry Mildred’s spirit with me in my new position as a community organizer with the Tenants Union of Washington in Seattle, which was recently named the number one city for apartment rent increases in the country. Any push for rent stabilization in Seattle will be a hard-won fight due to a statewide ban on rent control. Displacement and gentrification both run rampant in the city as for-profit developers snatch up affordable housing and drive up rents in historical communities of color. While our city’s Just Cause Eviction Ordinance prevents landlords from terminating tenancies at will, still approximately 10 households are evicted every day. I brace myself for all of these challenges knowing that other Black women are in this fight with me ready to create space for other Black women in the housing justice movement. I fervently believe that my role in this movement is to amplify and elevate the voices of Black women because more than any other population, we need housing justice and we need it now.
fitness-fits-me:

fitness blog :)

fitness-fits-me:

fitness blog :)

(Source: jetiensa, via befitbebeautiful)

All Power To The People (Released: 1996)
Japanese-American Human Rights Activist Yuri Kochiyama

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via blindeafmute)

driftingsilently:

Not to mention a lot of slave owners were black.

There was a difference between a black slave owner and a white slave owner. a black person used the slave as servants to protect them from the abuse of white people. They bought them so they will no longer be victim of rape and mental/physical abuse. They will later create a form of kinship. White people used slaves as free labor and could create injustices. If you think that the only reason black people are mad is because of slavery. Than you need to read a book because we need to fix our race relations. 

driftingsilently:

Not to mention a lot of slave owners were black.

There was a difference between a black slave owner and a white slave owner. a black person used the slave as servants to protect them from the abuse of white people. They bought them so they will no longer be victim of rape and mental/physical abuse. They will later create a form of kinship. White people used slaves as free labor and could create injustices. If you think that the only reason black people are mad is because of slavery. Than you need to read a book because we need to fix our race relations. 

(Source: aswintheantifeminist)

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

biracialprincen:

Are you kidding me? This is disgusting.
You can still be racist and not own slaves, its not like slavery is the defining point of a racist.
Some people can even be racist without knowing it.

So the truth is disgusting to you?

No, the fact that you think only 1.6% of Americans, in the 1860s, were racist.  Or that we solely hate them for that. 

The picture says that only 1.6% of US citizens owned slaves when slavery was at its peak, not that only 1.6% of Americans were racist at that time. Learn how to read.

It says at the bottom to stop justifying your hate for the white race for a mere 1.6% actions, meaning, they are trying to say, only 1.6% of people have been racist, which is, obviously, not true. 
Learn how to read.

Many people hate whites simply because of slavery, and that it’s ridiculous to base your hate for an entire race on the actions of a mere 1.6%. It isn’t saying that only 1.6% of people have been racist. You people are so dense it’s astounding and honestly hilarious.

Many people hate whites because they are racist, and slavery was, a racist action. 
Many people hate whites, because they hate people who aren’t white. 
I highly doubt people solely hate white people for slavery, although its definitely one reason. (I wouldn’t be happy either if I was treated like, well, a slave.)

You act as if it’s justifiable to hate an entire race because of the actions of some. You say you wouldn’t be happy if you were treated like a slave. Well guess what, you weren’t, and neither were any of the people who hate whites for that reason, so it’s about damn time you got over it.

Literally no one hates today’s white people for whatever their ancestors did. We hate today’s white people, not because they are white, but because most are racist, some without even knowing, and because they are treated much better in today’s world still, yet most don’t do much about it besides not becoming an active racist. 

Literally so many people hate us because of what our ancestors did. Others just hate us out of envy, which is quite understandable. I hope you realize most whites don’t even care that you hate them. You’re irrelevant to us, and you should quit wasting all your energy on hating us.

If you are an American and you think that the reason minorities don’t like you is because of slavery than you are VERY ignorant about American history and what it has done to other races by wealthy people in power and how other lower income racists will kill and beat people because of their skin. Black people were lynched as entertainment and KKK bring their family to watch. So many black people were killed in America without justice.


So many Native American were forced at gun point, killed, and rapped to be pushed onto reserves.

The Asian- Americans were abused in concentration camps in America!


In the 1970’s America created the War on Drugs that fucked more minorities up. by imprisoning them at crazy rates.

People are pissed about all of this ^^^^^^^and so much more because all of this was created so the White American race could continue to have power and money. 

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

silentilluminary:

aswintheantifeminist:

biracialprincen:

Are you kidding me? This is disgusting.

You can still be racist and not own slaves, its not like slavery is the defining point of a racist.

Some people can even be racist without knowing it.

So the truth is disgusting to you?

No, the fact that you think only 1.6% of Americans, in the 1860s, were racist.  Or that we solely hate them for that. 

The picture says that only 1.6% of US citizens owned slaves when slavery was at its peak, not that only 1.6% of Americans were racist at that time. Learn how to read.

It says at the bottom to stop justifying your hate for the white race for a mere 1.6% actions, meaning, they are trying to say, only 1.6% of people have been racist, which is, obviously, not true. 

Learn how to read.

Many people hate whites simply because of slavery, and that it’s ridiculous to base your hate for an entire race on the actions of a mere 1.6%. It isn’t saying that only 1.6% of people have been racist. You people are so dense it’s astounding and honestly hilarious.

Many people hate whites because they are racist, and slavery was, a racist action. 

Many people hate whites, because they hate people who aren’t white. 

I highly doubt people solely hate white people for slavery, although its definitely one reason. (I wouldn’t be happy either if I was treated like, well, a slave.)

You act as if it’s justifiable to hate an entire race because of the actions of some. You say you wouldn’t be happy if you were treated like a slave. Well guess what, you weren’t, and neither were any of the people who hate whites for that reason, so it’s about damn time you got over it.

Literally no one hates today’s white people for whatever their ancestors did. We hate today’s white people, not because they are white, but because most are racist, some without even knowing, and because they are treated much better in today’s world still, yet most don’t do much about it besides not becoming an active racist. 

Literally so many people hate us because of what our ancestors did. Others just hate us out of envy, which is quite understandable. I hope you realize most whites don’t even care that you hate them. You’re irrelevant to us, and you should quit wasting all your energy on hating us.

If you are an American and you think that the reason minorities don’t like you is because of slavery than you are VERY ignorant about American history and what it has done to other races by wealthy people in power and how other lower income racists will kill and beat people because of their skin. Black people were lynched as entertainment and KKK bring their family to watch. So many black people were killed in America without justice.

So many Native American were forced at gun point, killed, and rapped to be pushed onto reserves.

The Asian- Americans were abused in concentration camps in America!

In the 1970’s America created the War on Drugs that fucked more minorities up. by imprisoning them at crazy rates.

People are pissed about all of this ^^^^^^^and so much more because all of this was created so the White American race could continue to have power and money. 

itsamadloveaffair:

shutupbreanna:

Tumblr has skewed the definitions of so many terms it’s like a blur of hatred.

Racism is defined as the belief that all members of each race possess characteristics or abilities specific to that race, especially so as to distinguish it as inferior or superior to another race or races.

So a few…

My first recommendation to understanding racism is to read 

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

Also read this post so you can understand how the government screwed up minorities’ communities:

http://itsamadloveaffair.tumblr.com/post/97567985611/peopleofthediaspora-a-very-brief-overview-of#notes

dynastylnoire:

abutag:

I found my grandmas art books from the 1950s and they’ve got really good info in there!

This though was hers, it’s on a pretty big piece if tracing paper and it’s got crazy detail. There’s others but this is my favorite from what I’ve found.

It was really folded up and between pages and really yellowed, so the photos aren’t the best.

AMAZING!!!!!

It’s awesome when you find your relatives are artists.

raianxionsin:

White people say, “How come everyone else can say they’re proud of their race but we can’t?”

The problem is, almost literally every time in history white got “proud” of their race, *millions* of got people oppressed, murdered, got enslaved, and/or colonized.

Ya’ll can’t get…

Because it’s race on their own race!

raianxionsin:

White people say, “How come everyone else can say they’re proud of their race but we can’t?”

The problem is, almost literally every time in history white got “proud” of their race, *millions* of got people oppressed, murdered, got enslaved, and/or colonized.

Ya’ll can’t get…

You don’t even now how oppression works. The dehumanizing of other races works in white people’s favor. A stereotype of a black person keeps white people safer. A black guy with a wallet is more likely to be killed than a white guy with a gun due to shooter bias.

peopleofthediaspora:

A very brief overview of the so-called “War on Drugs” which lends its purpose to disenfranchising Black and Latino peoples, promoting poverty, and the creation/perpetuation of stereotypes (thugs, dope boys, criminals, Welfare Queens, etc.), which ultimately threaten not just our general well being and success, but our lives, such as in the cases of Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Eric Garner and countless others.  This is the true example of racism.  Fuck your hurt feelings,  we are fighting for just our basic rights to live.

"The carefully engineered appearance of great racial progress strengthens the ‘colorblind’ public consensus that personal and cultural traits, not structural arrangements, are largely responsible for the fact that the majority of young black men in urban areas across the United States are currently under the control of the criminal justice system or branded as felons for life… Far from undermining the current system of control, the new caste system depends, in no small part, on black exceptionalism.  The colorblind public consensus that supports the new caste system insist that race no longer matters.  Now that America has officially embraced Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream (by reducing it to the platitude "that should be judged by the content of our character and not by the color of our skin"), the mass incarceration of people of color can be justified only to the extent that the plight of those locked up and out is understood to be their choice, not their birthright… Black success stories lend credence to the notion that anyone, no matter how poor or how black you may be, can make it to the top, if only you try hard enough.”

– Michelle Alexander, New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

brown-princess:

Tumblr: @afro-senpaiiIG: @mirramoni

brown-princess:

Tumblr: @afro-senpaii
IG: @mirramoni

(via blacknoirschwarz)

"Black people must do so many drugs, and commit so many crimes to constitute 60% of the prison system, because all the white college kids I know do drugs and they aren’t in jail."

Senior Business Major (via shitrichcollegekidssay)

The irony is scary.